Dream On: Cirque’s KURIOS show at Dodger Stadium, Los Angeles, CA

While much of America tuned into the Republican debate last night, I was watching curiosities of a different kind at KURIOS – Cabinet des Curiosités created by the enigmatic Montreal-based Cirque du Soleil. This show may not tour as long as the run for presidency (it ends in Los Angeles on February 7, 2016 before visiting Atlanta, Boston, NY, and DC), but it is a wonderful way to get lost in theatrical alchemy: acrobatics, steam punk fashion, otherwordly creatures, and soaring vocals by the brilliant Greek singer, Erini Tornesaki.

As soon as you enter the Cirque’s big top tent, or the Grand Chapiteau, you give yourself over to Kurios‘ fantastical world of the late 19th century, an era of steam power and engineering that influenced a whole subgenre of science fiction (20,000 Leagues Under The Sea by Jules Verne, HG Wells’ Time Machine) and steam punk culture.

Our Kurios scientist is the inventor of a machine that transcends time and space. When the clock freezes at 11.11 — wishing hour — we’re introduced to the main characters in his cabinet of curiosities. There’s an accordion-shaped man; a telegraph named Klara in a hoop skirt that transmits messages; and Mr Microcosmos, the embodiment of the technological process, whose subconscious takes the form of a tiny lady named Mini Lili that lives in his boiler-as-potbelly.

I love Cirque for its contortionists, acrobats, and balancing acts, and in this show, they’re  as amazing as ever. A quartet of bendy ladies dressed as sea creatures effortlessly twist into unreal poses atop a giant mechanical hand. Twin aerialists display muscular strength while arm balancing on a set of rings. Rebounding off of an Acro Net, artists jump, flip, and glide through the air like swimmers in the sea. And just when you thought you’d seen it all, a chair balance taking place at a dinner party is interrupted by a second party happening above, upside down, on the ceiling. Suddenly, two sets of chairs  are being stacked towards each other from opposite directions. Teetering on the brink, they finally touch.

Perhaps the most unexpected act of the show is the finger puppetry, where one hand, costumed in sneakers and a baseball cap, dances to hip hop, swims, and performs skateboard moves on a mini theatre stage — all filmed with live video that’s projected onto a giant screen — before taking off in a hot air balloon. The act ends as a love story (there’s a second set of fingers involved) on top of an audience member’s head. It shouldn’t make sense, but it does – a perfect example of success in bizarre experimentation.

That’s the thing about Cirque du Soleil. It asks us to embrace the unexpected and stretch beyond our imaginations. I’m always compelled to write more, dream bigger, and read fiction after a show (I’m about to watch Oz the Great and Powerful actually). In Kurios, an invisible theatre act forces you to fill the void of the unseen characters whose presence is only made apparent by the consequences of their movements. Sound strange? It is, but it can be as crazy as you imagine it.

Other acts include the gripping Rola Bola that involves an aviator balancing atop a stack of tubes on a swing; a yo-yo extraordinaire (he lends a retro air); an aerial cyclist; and acrobats performing mesmerising synchronised sequences.

The whirlwind two-hour performance comes to an end when the Kurios clock flips to 11.12. As we filed out, I dared the performance to inhabit my dreams.

Photos Martin Girard / shootstudio.ca

Changing San Francisco, CA

I’ll admit I can be annoying to travel with. Usually I’m the first to shower and get dressed; I’m ready to go, walk, and explore.

But there are times when something slows me down enough that I instinctively reach for my camera.

It happened on a recent October morning in San Francisco. The view from the hotel room had me from the time I woke up until my reluctant trudge out the door. See the Golden Gate Bridge, Coit Tower, and Alcatraz? Now, imagine watching them rouse as the light changes from semi-dark to pink to bright white.

Seeing San Francisco from this point of view gave me a whole new appreciation for the city. It was also a good reminder to stay in the moment.

6AM, from the window of Loews Regency, 40 floors up

6AM, from the window of Loews Regency, 43 floors up

7AM, pink and blue hues paint the sky

7AM, pink and blue hues paint the sky

8AM, bright lights means time for work.

8AM, bright lights means time for work.

Shhhh… Secrets about California’s Wine Country, Sonoma and Napa

We had a great time in Napa and Sonoma, and going in with an open mind, asked a lot about the region that may be obvious to those in the know, but not to us. For example, why does Korbel  use the word “champagne” on its bottles when it’s produced in the Russian River Valley, CA? Same goes for Sonoma’s “port”. And why is there a ban on weddings in Napa?

I found out ten secrets about the region and compiled them here:

http://travelinsider.qantas.com.au/usa/california/interesting-things/california-wine-regions-10-secrets

I hope it helps with your trip to the wine country!

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Catalina Island, California

I’m sprawled on a deck chair on the Relaxation Deck of the Island Spa Catalina. Blissed out after a hot stone spa treatment, I’m sipping champagne and taking in a million-dollar ocean view — I don’t want to move. It’s about four in the afternoon, and being winter, the sun will set within the hour. I call my husband and coax him to laze about with me (he’s in the hotel), before reflecting on the day we’ve had.

It began with a helicopter flight from Long Beach to Catalina Island – a 15-minute trip over the Pacific Ocean, which at this time of year is experiencing a mighty whale migration. (Our pilot spotted one, although it didn’t want to wave its tail at us.)  After touch-down, we woke up over coffee at Pavilion Hotel while absorbing its oceanfront view — an instant way to de-stress. The morning was brisk but by 10am, the West Coast sun had warmed us up, dispelling any notion of winter in January. Psyched for some adventure, we were chauffeured by golf buggy – the standard mode of island transportation — to the zipline camp, where, after scaling heights in a harness and helmet, I’d shown my nerve-wracked, shrieky side. By the fifth go, fears had somewhat subsided but the adrenaline was still pumping. A “spa” lunch of Caesar salad with avocado dressing helped calm the nerves, as did the Sage Stone Purification Ritual in the spa’s luxurious two-storey Silver Peaks Suite. I kid you not, the suite was the size of a big-city condo, and I felt a little like royalty. I snuck a snooze on the ground-level couch before heading out.

Now, my husband’s come to join me, just as the sun is setting behind us; the Carnival cruise ship in front is slowly losing its gleam. He orders a coffee; I ask for some snacks. We revel in the moment. Life doesn’t really get better than this. We talk, laugh, and muse until a chill fills the air, and we reluctantly unravel and head toward our hotel. But all is not lost. Wine and cheese await in the hotel’s library, followed by a dinner of California red trout, diver scallops, and chilled Rusack Sauvignon Blanc at nearby Avalon Grill. We recline by the fire pit and bask in the moment once more.

Island Spa Catalina

Island Spa Catalina

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Zip lining (spot my husband on the line)

Zip lining (spot my husband on the line)

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View from a helicopter

View from a helicopter

Overexposed Malibu, CA

Starting the New Year with the warm sun on my back, a glass full of bubbles, easy conversation, a school of dolphins gliding past the pier, and a twinkly ocean — being by the water is the perfect tonic for a day that’s usually filled with well-intentioned resolutions, unnecessary expectations, people nursing hangovers, and all the trappings associated with the turning of a digit.

It’s not easy to summarise Malibu. I think it’s more a state of mind, which probably explains the overexposed photos. Cheers to a sensational and memorable 2015!

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Chinatown, San Francisco, and Happy 2015!

On our way back home from Napa and Sonoma, we decided to detour via San Francisco’s Chinatown. A happy surprise from veering off the direct route was the drive over the Golden Gate Bridge. It was a beautiful day — any nip from the chill was cured by the sun — and that sense of expansiveness from seeing the San Francisco Bay and Pacific Ocean felt glorious.

Being Christmas Day, Chinatown was alive and lit with colour. Bakeries were packed with people and moon cakes; the alleyways bustled with tourists; and storefronts displayed a motley of knick-knacks: good luck cats, New Year cards, jade bracelets, hologram 2015 calendars. The air resonated with traditional Chinese string music, either from the strum of a solo busker or a quartet.

It was an unplanned side trip but such a happy one. On that note, I wish you all a prosperous and healthful 2015. May it be full of surprise, unexpected detours, and happy outcomes. XO

Golden Gate Bridge

Golden Gate Bridge

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Grape Expectations — Napa and Sonoma, CA

Having dreamt of northern California’s wine country for so long meant I’d given the area an almost mythical quality. I’d envisioned driving on a dirt track of a quaint town, past rows of gnarled vines backed by undulating hills haloed under a golden sun; stopping at the first winery spotted along the way to sample glasses of red while chatting with the vintner. And so, finally prompted to action, last week my husband and I set off on the 6-hour long drive from Los Angeles to Napa and Sonoma.

Our first morning delivered a low fog that hovered over rolling hills lined with hibernating vines, which looked like the spikes of hair drawn on a bald cartoon head. By mid-morning, the mist had fizzled away, replaced with a soft glow from the winter sun. We followed highways and paved roads navigated by tall signposts with multiple arrows pointing this way to that winery, and that way to those wineries, which only reinforced the sheer size of the region. Sometimes we drove distances of 15 minutes between spots on Napa’s Silverado Trail; on another day, we climbed a sinuous road for just under an hour to reach a cluster of wineries located farther north, in Sonoma county.

Dropping in and chatting with the winemaker really was the stuff of my dreams. Wine samplings ranged from one-on-one tastings with reps (in the less touristy areas of Sonoma), to sharing the tasting bar with a dozen visitors (in better known Napa wineries), to comparing tasting notes in a group after a tour, which turned out to be one of my favourite experiences. HALL Wines in St Helena does a beautiful job of marrying their wine tasting experience with a walk through its “cellar” and indoor-outdoor public areas that are interspersed with modern artworks – sculptures, an LED installation, and Patrick Dougherty’s whimsical wood huts — before heading up to the second-story glass tasting rooms to sample one of the smoothest Pinot Noirs amongst other varietals. (At one point, one of the ladies was so overcome with the Pinot that she was dreaming of steak… at 11 in the morning.)

My anticipatory visions weren’t too far off, yet a new set of stills plays a different story in my mind. The wine country is a myth no more. NB: The photos were taken with my new SAMSUNG NX 300 camera. The auto focus via a touch screen performs at lightning speed.

Chateau Montelena, Napa

Chateau Montelena, Napa

Reflections in the lake at the Japanese garden, Chateau Montelena

Reflections in the lake at the Japanese garden, Chateau Montelena

At MUMM, Napa

At MUMM, Napa

MUMM tasting

MUMM tasting

Patrick Doherty's art installation at HALL Wines

Patrick Dougherty’s art installation at HALL Wines

Vineyards at Hall Wines

Vineyards at Hall Wines in St. Helena

HALL wine tasting

HALL wine tasting

Vines and palms, at HALL Wines

Vines and palms, at HALL Wines

Treetops at Ferrari-Carano winery, Sonoma

Treetops at Ferrari-Carano winery, Sonoma

Vineyards at Ferrari-Carano

Vineyards at Ferrari-Carano

Passing vines at Kenwood, Sonoma

Passing vines at Kenwood, Sonoma

The gardens at Chateau St Jean, Kenwood

The gardens at Chateau St Jean, Kenwood

Wine country Christmas

Wine country Christmas