Magnificent Moscow in Oryx Magazine, Qatar Airways

Anaïs Nin: “We write to taste life twice, in the moment and in retrospect.”

It’s a nice feeling to relive travel memories. My “Weekend Away in Moscow” was published in this month’s Oryx Magazine for Qatar Airways. If you’re not traveling on the airline in September, you can take a read of the snapshot here:

“At 867 years of age, Moscow shows no signs of slowing down. Rather, the sprawling metropolis is an energetic international hub, buzzing with 12 million residents and ranking second in the global billionaire stakes. This fascinating city is a melange of glitz, glamour, and a rich cultural heritage.” Read more: weekend away – Magnificent Moscow – Europe – Oryx In-Flight Magazine.

These pictures will make sense after you’ve read the piece.

Red Square2

The cobblestoned Red Square

Red Square x 2

Red Square x 2

The 19th-century premium shopping mall, GUM

The 19th-century premium shopping mall, GUM

New Tretyakov Gallery, housed in the Central House of Artists

New Tretyakov Gallery, housed in the Central House of Artists

Art in New Tretyakov: The New Moscow (1027) by Yuri Pimenov

Art in New Tretyakov: The New Moscow (1937) by Yuri Pimenov

Gorky Park and the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art run by Dasha Zhukova

Gorky Park and the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art run by Dasha Zhukova

Cafe at Garage

Cafe at Garage

The moonlit Red Square

The moonlit Red Square

The Red Square illuminated from the Moscow River

The Red Square illuminated from the Moscow River

 

A Weekend of Photographing

Well, that’s the plan anyway…

This long weekend marks the end of the summer (not technically) in the USA. With some spare hours, I hope to pick up the camera and become a tourist. Obviously, it’s easier to do so when on holidays… Oh, Happy Labour Day!

My sister took this photo of me in St Petersburg, Russia.

My sister took this photo of me in St Petersburg, Russia.

From Russia With Love Locks

If you’ve scheduled a cruise along the Moscow River, you’re likely to come across Luzhkov Bridge — a pedestrian walkway lined with iron trees decorated in hundreds of love locks. Apparently this area is a popular backdrop for wedding photos but the only people I saw posing under the blazing sun were snap-happy tourists.

Whatever the season, it is a very cool sight to see. You can get there on foot, about a twenty-minute walk from the Kremlin; by metro; or by chance, as I discovered it after visiting the nearby Tretyakov Gallery.

Wishing you a lovely weekend!

DSC_0589PS

White Nights in St Petersburg, Russia

I met my mum and sister in St Petersburg, Russia, just as June rolled into July; when the glorious White Nights were are their peak. The sun hardly slept — sometimes it napped under a blanket of clouds — and when the moon showed its face, it shone as bright as a beacon. The historic city was always illuminated and teeming with life, but its wide open spaces allowed for pause and reflection. I was awake throughout.

St Isaac's Cathedral

St Isaac’s Cathedral

View of Hotel Astoria and St Isaac's Square from the cupola of St Isaac's Cathedral

View of Hotel Astoria and St Isaac’s Square from the cupola of St Isaac’s Cathedral

Pigeons at Alexander Nevsky Monastery

Pigeons at Alexander Nevsky Monastery

The grand Petrodvoretz, the Tsar's Summer Palace

The grand Petrodvoretz, the Tsar’s Summer Palace

On the birch tree-lined fringes of the Gulf of Finland at Petrodvorets, the Tsar's summer palace

On the birch tree-lined fringes of the Gulf of Finland at Petrodvorets, the Tsar’s Summer Palace

Boating along the canals

Boating along the canals

Me, dwarfed by the palatial Hermitage

Me, dwarfed by the palatial Hermitage, the Winter Palace of every Tsar and Tsarina since Catherine the Great

Midsummer night light streaming through at 10pm

Midsummer night light streaming through at 10pm at Petro Palace Hotel

The moon by St Isaac's Cathedral

The moon by St Isaac’s Cathedral

Social Media: The Winogrand Effect

I read an interesting article in New York magazine by Jerry Saltz titled, “Photographing Through The Cracks: Garry Winogrand captured America as it split wide open.” It discusses an exhibition of the street photographer’s work currently on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

The last paragraph stood out because it made me think about the future of art; the formal study of photography; the role of curator; and social media’s role in propelling a new generation of self-taught photographers. Here’s the quote:

“The whole world is now filled with incredible images–especially on Instagram and other social networks–that owe something to Winogrand’s, documenting life, change, and all the rest. Yet the art world and museums are not. Instead they tend to show oversize, very still pictures or images that investigate formal properties and ideas of display and presentation. I love many of those pictures, but what’s happening online on social media deserves far more serious scrutiny than it’s getting. If the art world doesn’t admit more of this sort of deceptively casual-seeming work, the outside world will reject more so-called art photography than it already does. That’s a divide that we don’t need to reestablish and widen.”

Thoughts?

St. Isaac's Cathedral, photographed in July during a trip to St Petersburg (with a Nikon)

St. Isaac’s Cathedral, photographed in July during a trip to St Petersburg (on an angle with a Nikon and prime lens. I should add that my sister took amazing photos of the same cupola with an iPhone.).

Wanderlust — by Richard Avedon

Avedon was a poet and we didn’t know it?

Reading photographer Richard Avedon’s 1941 Scholastic Art & Writing award-winning poem Wanderlust on the back page of this month’s Harpers Bazaar was an apropos finale to a marathon magazine-reading session on an overcast Saturday in L.A.

WANDERLUST

You must not think because my glance is quick

To shift from this to that, from here to there,

Because I am most usually where

The way is strangest and the wonders thick,

Because when wind is wildest and the bay

Swoops madly upward and the gulls are few

And I am doing as I want to do,

Leaving the town to go my aimless way;

You must not think because I am the kind

Who always shunned security and such

As bother the responsible of mind

That I shall never total up to much;

I know my drifting will not prove a loss,

For mine is a rolling stone that has gathered moss.

Richard Avedon via npr.org

Richard Avedon via npr.org