Day Of The Dead, El Paso, Texas

When my husband and I drove from NY to LA, we stopped in the Texan town of El Paso, located so close to the Mexican border that you can see people crossing the Santa Fe Bridge over Rio Bravo. It’s a gorgeous “little” big town and we had a great time exploring. We awoke in the 1917-built Camino Real Hotel with its spectacular Tiffany glass dome, breakfasted on custard-filled croissants and deli coffee from Blue Seal Bakery, and later, feasted on meat-filled tacos at L&J Cafe. Those tacos were really really good.

In between, we’d also managed to squeeze in a visit to the El Paso Museum of Art where we saw works by local artists and American Impressionists. Never one to miss a museum store, my eyes devoured its selection of Mexican handicrafts, coffee table books, and handmade jewelry. Which is when I happened upon a mariachi band whose miniature musicians were dressed in Halloween costumes. Upon closer inspection, I realised they were celebrating The Day of the Dead. I loved it; I bought it.

That was two years ago. I am transported every time I look over at my little mariachi band on the bookshelf: that sunny El Pasoan day, the music filling the streets, the mountains in the distance, and a slower pace of life.

DSC_0672PS

DSC_0678PS

Pink Beach, Indonesia

Have you ever seen a pink beach? There are only a handful of them in the world — one  is located in Indonesia on Padar Island by Flores.

See a picture of it here, in a piece I wrote for Qantas about the world’s largest archipelago:

http://travelinsider.qantas.com.au/indonesia/jakarta/photo-gallery/10-pristine-indonesian-beaches/8-pink-beach-padar-island-flores

Note to surfers: check out the photos of Sumba and the Mentawai Islands in Sumatra. These spots have some of the best waves in the world.

This is not the pink beach but it is Kanawa island shrouded in a rosy sunset.

This is not the pink beach but it is Kanawa Island veiled by a rosy sunset.

What if Amazon did New Yorker covers?

marinachetner:

For all the book lovers out there…

Originally posted on madewithink:

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Here’s an excellent satire on how Jeff Bezos has impacted the way we enjoy books. The original New Yorker cover is truly fabulous, but I love the way some internet wag has cleaned the whole lot out, replacing the last book with a Kindle. Which was kind of suggested on the New Yorkers’ own site, when they tell the story of how the original cover came about. (Posted by AndyCowles)

View original

Salt Water, Malibu

Malibu is one of the most beautiful places to visit for uninterrupted views of the water; where the eyes can rest their gaze on the infinite horizon. Listening to the waves crash before lapping the shore is at once soothing and invigorating. Worries dissipate; everything feels lighter.

There’s a quote by Isak Dinesen that reads: ‘The cure for anything is salt water – tears, sweat, or the sea.’

I completely agree.

The view of Malibu Pier from Nikita restaurant

The view of Malibu Pier from Nikita restaurant

the_sea

A Riesling dwarfs El Matador

A German Riesling dwarfs El Matador

malibuview

Moscow’s Stunning White Nights, Russia

As with all things last minute, paperwork processing delays had me push my trip to Russia back by a week. This meant I missed touring Moscow with my mum and sister; instead tacking it on after our sojourn in St Petersburg. Alas, I travelled solo.

I have a soft spot for Moscow. The capital moves at a faster pace than St Petersburg, which is located an easy four hour train ride away on the speedy Sapsan. She buzzes like New York but her grand squares and wide boulevards allow breathing room to appreciate the vast historic surrounds.

Some of my most memorable moments were spent gazing through hotel windows and strolling by the Moscow River, listening to the sounds of the city while watching the sun set way past its usual bedtime.

View of Red Square from Hotel National

View of Red Square from Hotel National

The Red Square

The Red Square

St Basil's Cathedral

St Basil’s Cathedral

Volleyball in Gorky Park

Volleyball in Gorky Park

Fountains in Gorky Park

Fountains in Gorky Park

St Basil's Cathedral

St Basil’s Cathedral

Supermoon

Supermoon

Moscow River sunset

Moscow River sunset

Bontempi at Red October Factory

Bontempi at Red October Factory

Church of Christ the Saviour

Church of Christ the Saviour

Moscow River

Moscow River

The setting midnight sun

The setting midnight sun

David Hockney Is Back in LA…

… and he’s working.

In a recent Harper’s Bazaar news piece he discusses his upcoming exhibition, titled “The Arrival of Spring”, set to open in New York’s Pace Galley on September 5, consisting of works created on the iPad.

Yes, iPad.

The author of the article, William Boyd, writes that the show consists of a series of iPad prints, “some very large, of his favourite spots around Bridlington and, more significantly, a collection of charcoal drawings, showing the eponymous arrival of spring in the wood, lanes, and byways of East Yorkshire.”

Hockney is a self-professed technophile: “I do think the iPad is a new art form. Much better than a lithograph.” He goes on to express his thoughts about the absence of drawing classes in art schools: “It’s criminal. Drawing teaches people to look.”

I’m not sure how I feel about the iPad as a visual medium. Is it ok for an established artist like Hockney to exhibit such works, but not the other way round? Similarly, if photographer Annie Lebovitz exhibited a series of Instagram photos in a gallery, would that be ok?

And, is it true that art schools teach drawing any more? Thoughts?

From the September issue of US Harper's Bazaar

From the September issue of US Harper’s Bazaar